Asheville: The Most Walkable City in the Southeast?

We’re dreaming of spring: when our windows stay open. In warm weather, nothing beats a morning or afternoon (or heck, even an evening) stroll, awash in the glow of the sun and the sound of birds singing. Well, unless the city you’re in doesn’t make that walk particularly easy or pleasant; it’s hard to enjoy a walk if you have to keep looking out for traffic because there are no sidewalks, and it’s hard to find the time to walk in the midst of your daily to-do list if there’s nothing on that list you can walk to.

A city being “walkable”—meaning the degree to which one can get by without regular use of a car—has become more and more important to residents as the health, savings, environmental, and other benefits have become better known. Research has shown that increases in a city’s walkability leads to increased healthy physical activity and also reduces body mass index on average for residents. It also makes for a healthier living environment, with cleaner air and reduced emissions due to the lower reliance on vehicles.

Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Asheville, North Carolina is making its case for a scenic, modern, walkable living destination. With lots to do downtown and replete with opportunities in the immediate area for hiking, camping, kayaking, canoeing, and more, it’s perfect for an active, healthy lifestyle, and makes a walkable, car-free life not only possible, but ideal.

Convenience and Comfort

Downtown Asheville is equipped with all that you’d need on a daily basis. Working or living in the city puts residents within walking distance of banks, grocers, shopping destinations, food, and entertainment. Coupled with the city’s ART bus system, Asheville’s destinations, whether they be downtown or in the surrounding neighborhoods, are always just a few minutes away.

Not only is it good for the environment, but not needing a car will help your wallet out considerably too, without becoming an inconvenience. Most of the destinations below are walkable from a downtown location, but the aforementioned buses and wealth of ridesharing options in Asheville are available for the occasional longer trip.

Healthy Asheville

While the health benefits of walking are well documented, it’s important to also keep in mind the value of having destinations like Yoga classes, gyms, and many public parks all within walking distance near the place you live. Asheville’s residents are very health-minded, and meditation centers and healing salt caves are all available for those who seek them.

In addition, Asheville’s immediate proximity to the mountains, plus nearby rivers and lakes, means the outdoorsperson will have plenty to do to stay in shape and take advantage of this beautiful, four-season part of the country. Whether you’d prefer to hike Asheville’s hills and mountains in search of a breathtaking view or a waterfall, or go rafting and ziplining with French Broad Adventures, access to your preferred outdoor activity is right nearby. Stop by the Botanical Gardens at Asheville for a picnic or a walk, and spend some quality time with mother nature without needing to stray far from home.

 

Music, Art, and History: Asheville is a Cultural Hub

Asheville is a city with both a rich past and an exciting today. Here’s just a smattering of activities and sights to be taken in in Asheville—all easily accessible by foot.

  • Take in a concert or show at the S. Cellular Center, or for a more intimate venue, check out the historic Orange Peel—named one of the top 5 rock clubs in the nation by Rolling Stone in 2008, having held concerts by the likes of Bob Dylan, Arcade Fire, Joan Jett, Ice Cube, Macklemore, Cyndi Lauper, and many more.
  • Get a world-class meal at a small-city price; Asheville has emerged in recent years as one of the top culinary destinations in the southeast. With restaurants like Buxton Hall BBQ, Curate, and Cucina 24, all a short walk from anywhere downtown, date nights and foodie excursions are bound to be memorable. And feel free to indulge yourself for desert at The French Broad Chocolate Lounge.
  • Asheville features a number of art galleries, bookstores, and museums to help you keep in touch with your creative side. Take one of the monthly Art Walks through the city’s 25+ galleries, attend a book reading at local favorite Malaprop’s Bookstore, or spend an afternoon in a museum of your choice: science, art, or even a pinball museum! Craving the theatre arts? The North Carolina Stage Company is also located in the heart of downtown to add a dash of drama to your life.
  • Go on a terrifying tour with Ghost Hunters of Asheville, or a much less haunted one with LaZoom’s tour trolleys.
  • Microbrew fan? Asheville is home to more breweries per capita than any U.S. city, including Wicked Weed for the hops fanatics, and the first brewery opened after Prohibition, the Highland Brewing Company.
  • Root for Asheville’s minor-league baseball team, the Asheville Tourists, at the centrally located McCormick Field.
  • Visit the historic Biltmore House—America’s largest home, built by George Vanderbilt—charming Biltmore Village for shopping and food, or learn about the history of weaving and woodworking in Asheville at the Grovewood Village.

 

As cities modernize and put walkability atop their priority lists, many of them will try to emulate the mix of convenience, excitement, and centrally-located layout of Asheville.

Of course, the city is already is a leader in walkability, and it’ll be hard for others to copy the perfect geographic location and historic, vibrant allure that makes the city such a destination. Who can say which city is the most “walkable,” but what is easy to see is how much residents and visitors love downtown Asheville, with everything you could need to live, work, and play just a few blocks away.

Asheville Named Among Best Places To Retire

Asheville has graced the headlines of major media outlets lately, especially when it comes to “best of” lists for 2017 and 2018.

MSN recently named our beautiful city one of the “dream places” to retire in the United States and again as a best “small town” retirement spot.

Forbes listed Asheville, NC among its must-visit and “coolest” places to go in 2018.

CNN recently ranked Asheville among its prestigious recommendations of destinations to visit in 2018.

There are a number of factors that boost our city’s profile among some of the most beautiful and engaging spots in the world: a vibrant arts culture, small-town cozy feel with city conveniences and amenities, award-winning food and breweries, and the great Appalachian outdoors…home to the one of the most biodiverse regions around the globe.

Whether planning for retirement or building a new life in Asheville, 145 Biltmore Avenue puts you at the heart of it all. Check out the details of this one-of-a-kind residence and see current availability.

 

Why Asheville’s South Slope Is One of the Hottest Addresses in NC

Picture a jelly doughnut. It’s delicious enough on its own, right? But—in the center is an extra-sweet filling, making something good even better. That’s how I like to think about Asheville and its South Slope neighborhood, respectively; a place that’s already amazing, yet there’s something more at its core that is not to be missed.

Just a few minutes’ walk from downtown Asheville, South Slope typifies the best of what Asheville is known for. This upscale, trendy part of town is packed with the city’s top restaurants, galleries, breweries, and more. Modern amenities and attractions co-mingling with a city of rich history is Asheville in a nutshell, and South Slope is the epitome of this combination. With luxury living spaces and high-class restaurants alongside beautiful parks, one of the most legendary music venues in the southeast, and more, South Slope is the place to be, even within this already popular Western North Carolina destination.

And don’t worry, if you’re now craving a doughnut after that intro, South Slope’s Vortex Doughnuts has you covered.

Brewery City

When I mentioned breweries above, how many did you picture? Two? Three? Well, hold on to your hops—Asheville has more than a few; it has the highest number of breweries per capita in the US, and South Slope is the epicenter of that scene. Hi-Wire Brewing, Wicked Weed, Catawba Brewing Company, Green Man Brewery, Twin Leaf Brewing, the Asheville Brewing Company, Burial Beer…all are located a short walk from any point in South Slope. And for the avid bicyclists who enjoy a cold pint after a ride, Beer City Bicycles provides a place for cyclists to talk shop over local brews. If you’re not into the microbrew scene, worry not; Asheville has a lot more to offer for both food and entertainment.

Healthy Living

Asheville is an extremely walkable city. Anyone living in South Slope can easily access all they’d need on a daily basis: grocers, banks, shopping, you name it and it’s available downtown. Not only does this walkable space help save transportation and vehicle maintenance costs, it’s great for the health-minded individual. With gyms, parks, yoga studios, and more within walking distance, staying in shape has never been easier, and with Asheville’s immediate proximity to outdoor activities—hiking, kayaking, camping, ziplining, and more—it’s never been more fun. Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains and right on the French Broad River, Asheville is a four-season city that provides healthy living options at every turn.

More the sporting type? Play a tennis match at Aston Park, or catch a baseball game. South Slope is host to Asheville’s minor-league baseball team, the Tourists, and their home stadium, McCormick Field. Pro tip: on Thirsty Thursdays at Tourists games, craft brews are just $2 a pop.

Feed Your Brain…

Asheville attracts creative types from all over, and the city is host to a number of top-notch galleries, theatres, and music venues. Though downtown is only a few blocks away, South Slope residents don’t have to go that far to check out some great art. For music, check out the legendary Orange Peel, a music venue that has hosted the likes of Bob Dylan, Arcade Fire, Joan Jett, and Macklemore, and in 2008 was named one of the top 5 rock clubs in the nation by Rolling Stone. A memorable night out in South Slope is only a few minutes from home.

…and Your Body!

And if you’re on a night out, you’re in luck! In Asheville you can find some of the best food in North Carolina and beyond, in a variety of cuisines and price points. Downtown Asheville has world-class restaurants for date nights, and for a more casual meal, a number of the breweries are also well-regarded eateries. It does seem like a new, terrific restaurant is popping up every week! Not to be missed is Ben’s Tune-Up in the South Slope, one of the most unique establishments you’ll ever come across: it’s a Japanese beer garden (built in a converted auto shop) that brews its own sake, offers a full Japanese-American fusion menu, and has live music on-site. If you love BBQ, you can’t miss nationally-renowned Buxton Hall. And for a cozy couples’ night, try Bartaco.

The South Slope is Only Going Up

Asheville as a whole is rapidly progressing and growing, and the South Slope gives you a front seat to the action. It provides the perfect location for a residence or vacation home, with some of the most stunning living spaces in the city, surrounded by lots to do and see (and eat). Comfort, convenience, and character; that’s the South Slope filling in the center of the treat that is Asheville living.

The Historical Renovation of Asheville from Quirky Getaway to Major Hotspot

Do you know Asheville’s history? Travel with us back to the roaring Twenties, when Asheville first became a shining star on the map and began its journey to the city it is today.

 

1920’s:

A City In The Blue Ridge Mountains Lays Down Its Roots in Art Deco Architectural Style

Scott Fitzgerald’s famous fictional character, Jay Gatsby, once waxed poetic about the “pictures of the sporting life at Asheville and Hot Springs and Palm Beach.” That the character knew of the South’s favorite mountain getaway makes sense: as written in “Gatsby’s Asheville,” by Michael Kruse, Asheville in the 1920’s is an easily imagined symbol of America’s era of excess and indulgence.

In the 1900’s, Asheville’s downtown was dubbed the “Paris of the South.” Wealthy landowners began to build their summer homes in Western North Carolina, including (of course) the famed Biltmore Estate. Thanks to the arrival of the train in the late 1800’s, Asheville’s transformation from a country village to a unique urban getaway in the mountains was well underway by the turn of the century.

As America headed into an era of prosperity in the 1920’s, Asheville’s downtown area saw a boom in development. More than 65 buildings were constructed downtown in the 1920’s (NPS). The Art Deco architectural style which remains the crux of Asheville’s downtown today is prominently symbolized by architect Douglas Ellington’s City Hall, conservative Neoclassical County Courthouse, Asheville High School and S&W Cafeteria.

The Grove Park Inn is another sweeping symbol of the lavish art deco style of the 1920’s. Fitzgerald himself spent months at the inn, “but not until later, when the seminal decade to which he had given so vivid a voice felt like distant history, and he himself was a husk, a lesson for those who cared to look.”

1930’s:

The Great Depression devastated Asheville. According to longtime Asheville local J. Patrick Whalen in The Atlantic, “an economic pall settled over the area for over 50 years; and there was no reason to do anything other than let buildings stand vacant or underutilized because nothing much was happening.”

 

1970’s:

In the 1970’s, the idea of revitalization swept through many communities across America. People were migrating from cities to suburbs, creating a desire for shopping centers.

In 1971, a mall was built on South Tunnel Rd. Businesses moved from downtown to the mall, subsequently devastating the downtown area.

According to Whalen, “a profound pessimism settled over the community so that every new idea floated to bring the city back was met with an oft-repeated refrain: ‘That will never work here – don’t even try.’”

An enclosed downtown mall project was proposed and voted down, but through the process local citizens found a renewed sense of investment and interest in the downtown area.

1980’s

In the 1980’s, some locals made attempts to strengthen the downtown business community and revitalize the area. According to The UNC Asheville Digital Archive, “In 1977, Asheville’s City Council established the Asheville Revitalization and Economic Redevelopment Commission or more commonly known as the ARC.”

In a formerly dry community, restaurants were now allowed to serve liquor by the drink. A summer festival called Bele Chere was established, and restaurants were allowed to seat patrons on sidewalk patios. Parking garages were built, even though there wasn’t a desire for increased parking downtown.

The response in the community was a backlash against local officials, and efforts to force them out of office. The efforts didn’t create an immediate revitalization, but they did lay the framework for future growth.

 

1990’s

Revitalization of the downtown in the 1990’s was supported in large part by two people: Roger Mcguire and Julian Price. Mcguire, a former advertising executive, moved to Buncombe County to retire.

McGuire became involved in revitalization efforts and invested in Pack Place. He fundraised, led nonprofit efforts to benefit the area, and threw his support behind a new arts and sciences center downtown.

In an interview with the Asheville Citizen-Times, McGuire said: “Madness is seeing things as they are and not as they might be.”

Julian Price met Mcguire and ended up allocating his small fortune to support businesses, artists, creatives and entrepreneurs downtown. In addition to supporting existing entrepreneurship, the pair also created businesses where they saw a need:

“a great local bookstore, a movie theater, a  European bakery, a grocery store, a number of interesting and appealing restaurants, a nationally known live music club, and high-speed Internet for downtown, while at the same time creating a number of affordable market rate apartments and condominiums so that people could live downtown.”

 

2000’s

In short: this time, it stuck. Entrepreneurs and developers were attracted to downtown, creating a robust and charming urban center set in a beautiful mountain landscape. Historic buildings have been renovated, hailing back to the art deco style of the 1920’s. A renewed “Shop Local” initiative, combined with a growing entrepreneurial and manufacturing hub, placed Asheville on the map as a place to “stay a while” and as a creative powerhouse, especially with regards to two tourism-driven industries: food and beverage. Asheville is home to almost three dozen breweries, many of which have received national acclaim and awards. In addition to chill brews, there are plenty of farm-to-table restaurants in almost every cuisine imaginable.

 

Asheville was named Lonely Planet’s #1 “Best in the US Destination” in 2017.

The city has earned a steady stream of accolades, including Travelocity’s “Festive Favorites: The Top 15 Cities for Seasonal Brews,” Craft Week’s “Top 10 Towns For Craft Lovers,” Elle Decor’s “The Coziest Cities in America,” and US World and Report’s “Best Foodie Destinations in the USA.”

Today, new housing developments such as 145 Biltmore Avenue are drawing on the inspiration from the 1920’s. 145 Biltmore, among the first residential buildings to appear in downtown in almost a decade, is designed in a modern take on art deco. Residences like these take us full circle to Gatsby’s view of the mountain town where culture, taste and living achieve new heights.

Links:

NPS National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary

The Atlantic: Asheville Just ‘Happened’ to Develop a Nice Downtown—or Did It?

Asheville Citizen-Times: McGuire saw Asheville as it ‘might be’

The UNC Asheville Digital Archive

National Parks Service: Architecture in Asheville

Personal Outdoor Spaces Are Crucial to Urban Living

What is the first image that comes to mind when you think about downtown Asheville living? Perhaps you envision sweeping views, city skylines, or unique industrial finishes.  Nights on the town, cultural events, and becoming a regular at any number of charming local establishments.

One aspect of buying a home or apartment in downtown Asheville you may not consider is the outdoor living space. But just because outdoor space hasn’t been the focus of most urban housing developers in the past doesn’t mean you should miss out on the current movement to create more livable outdoor space for downtown urban residents.

If you know you want to live in the city, consider seeking housing developments which make outdoor space a key focus in their design.

In fact, once they figure out that it’s possible, urban residents may find ample reason to prioritize outdoor living space- even more than suburban residents.

Why?

Perhaps some would balk at the idea of giving up coveted indoor square footage to something like a patio or outdoor kitchen. But most people don’t actually use all the indoor areas of their house- they frequent certain favorite spaces and essentially pay for other indoor spaces they hardly use. Typically, these spaces are dining rooms, sitting rooms, hallways, and entrances or foyers.

Prioritizing outdoor space in urban development is an up-and-coming housing trend because homeowners actually use outdoor space. As it turns out, people really like being outside! Not only will you actually hang out in your outdoor urban space- it will help you stay healthy and well-adjusted in a sometimes congested environment.

Parks and other urban green spaces have been proven to be beneficial physically and emotionally to urban residents. Downtown Asheville planners are prioritizing green space over “grey space” in city design, providing healthier, more livable and walkable urban environments.

Applying what we know about the benefits of including green space in urban planning to what we do as developers is the kind of innovation that will change our understanding of urban housing entirely.

Entertain the possibilities for outdoor living space in urban housing.

Urban living no longer means you have to stare out your sad window at the side of someone else’s building. If you’re in the market for a home, perhaps you thought you had to choose between the culture and excitement of urban living and the peace and enjoyment of an outdoor space on your property.

Now you can live, work and play in the city and relax outdoors without taking a retreat to the outskirts.

With innovative housing design, we can offer city dwellers more access to outdoor space than ever before. Visualize seamlessly blended indoor/outdoor spaces, joined by large sliding glass doors and windows. Instead of being relegated to their indoor rooms, residents can prep food or lounge with a cocktail on the deck on a balmy summer night or enjoy hot tea in a three-season “winter garden” room.

For example, our latest downtown housing development in Asheville, North Carolina gives residents access to all of the culture of downtown but prioritizes a focus on the mountains and making the building feel immersed in both the city and natural landscapes simultaneously. To do this, we designed the residences with plenty of efficient glass for mountain and treetop views, operable windows for fresh air and natural light, quaint seasonal garden rooms to maximize greenery and growth, and the largest private decks for cooking, playing and relaxing around a fireplace. Instead of forcing all the residents to share one small rooftop patio or garden, each resident has his or her own private outdoor living space.

Asheville has ample cultural and social draws for urban residents- whether you’re a craft beer enthusiast, music fan or foodie, this small city in the mountains is bursting at the seams with opportunities for engagement.

We couldn’t think of a better way to serve residents of the city in the mountains than to offer access to the beauty of the North Carolina outdoors and the experience of the city simultaneously.

Learn more about our sophisticated urban units with more outdoor living space than any other development, all in the heart of thriving downtown Asheville.

Spend A Day on Asheville’s Ale Trail

If you’ve heard anything about Asheville, you likely picked up on the fact that locals take pride in the thriving craft beer scene. In USA Today Anne Fitten Glenn, a brewery communications consultant and author of Asheville Beer: An Intoxicating History of Mountain Brewing explains Asheville’s historic home brewing connection, which dates back to the founding of Asheville in 1798.

“Back then, it was nearly impossible to get beer from the lowlands up here in the mountains,” Glenn says. “So if settlers wanted a fermented beverage, they had to make it themselves. That spirit of self-sufficiency and support for small local businesses makes Asheville a great place to open a brewery.”

No one has more access to the full scope of Asheville’s bustling local brewery scene than downtown residents. We picked local South Slope favorites to fill a lovely afternoon exploring the city’sbeer scene on foot. Asheville’s South Slope is a nice walk featuring an array of atmospheres, from a small industrial taproom to a brewery with an outdoor area frequented by families. Read on to discover an afternoon in downtown Asheville, featuring a wide variety of delightful brews to satisfy the thirstiest beer enthusiast.

Hoppy Ales, Open-Fermented Belgian Beers and Barrel Aged Sours by Wicked Weed

Wicked Weed is one of the most recognizable breweries in Asheville, and you’ll certainly find a crowd outside on any given weekend. The brewery specializes in in west coast style hoppy ales, open fermented belgian beers and barrel aged sours. Their focus? “The wildness of beer, the nonconformance of craft, and the conviction of creativity lead.”

Next Up: The Legend of Greenman and the Industrial Ambiance of Burial Beer Company

Greenman Brewing is known for their traditional English ales. Read the Legend of the Green Man, or ask one of their bartenders for a quick recap. The brewery recently constructed a 3 story, 20,000 square ft. packaging hall, a “brewtique”, and an indoor/outdoor top floor taproom that overlooks production and the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Burial Beer Co. is an experimental little brewery with an industrial feel whose team meticulously crafted special releases throughout 2013 to develop and test their craft beer. They now serve 10 beers on tap in addition to new pilot batches on a weekly basis.

An aside: in our book, Burial wins Best Beer Titles in Asheville. They serve up beers like “The Rise of the Merciless,” a saison, “Between Science And Superstition,” an ancient herbed ale, and “Post-Apocalyptic Awakening,” an imperial IPA.

Exciting changes are coming to Burial in 2017: the brewery has begun its second expansion to an additional location, called Forestry Camp, and 20 barrel production brewery, urban farm, locally purveyed restaurant and two-story tasting room in South Asheville.

Twin Leaf Brewery: A Family-Friendly Joint for Lunch and a Pint

You’ll love Twin Leaf’s outdoor space, relaxed atmosphere, and food options. It’s a perfect stop to refuel and relax.

At the brewery that aims to be a community steward and meeting house, you’ll find a great selection of Farmhouse Ales, Saisons, Stouts, IPA’s to pair with a locally made meal from El Querubin, Smashbox Mobile Kitchen or Salsaritas.  Check Twin Leaf’s food truck calendar to ensure you don’t miss their scheduled food truck slots.

For Sour And Funky Beer Enthusiasts, Wicked Weed’s Funkatorium Is a Must

The Funkatorium is the East Coast’s first sour and funky beer dedicated taproom. In Wicked Weed’s own words: “featuring over a dozen varieties of these burgeoning styles on draught, visitors can expect a full immersion into the old world way of experiencing and appreciating beer against the backdrop of Wicked Weed’s entire sour and funky barrel-aging program.”

Approachable and Balanced Ales and Lagers at Hi-Wire Brewing and Pizza & Beer by Asheville Brewing Company

To get a nice sense of contrast to the experimental vibes at Funkatorium, head over to your second to last stop: Hi Wire Brewing. The company brews balanced and approachable beer which can be enjoyed over multiple pints with friends- “how brewers have been striving to brew beers for thousands of years.” If you’re a fans of no-frills quality and a relaxed environment, Hi-Wire may be your favorite local spot.

Asheville Brewing Company is the last stop on our South Slope tour, because you really need to end the day with a delicious slice of pizza! Top of your tour off with a seasonal pint: the best-selling holiday spiced Ninjabread Man Porter, the winter-warming Carolina Mountain Monster Imperial Stout, and a zesty, summery Lemon Space Dog American Wheat.

Explore the excitement and leisurely pace of life as an Asheville Downtown Dweller.

Why Outdoor Spaces Are Crucial For Urban Living

What is the first image that comes to mind when you think about downtown Asheville living? Perhaps you envision sweeping views, city skylines, or unique industrial finishes.  Nights on the town, cultural events, and becoming a regular at any number of charming local establishments.

One aspect of buying a home or apartment in downtown Asheville you may not consider is the outdoor living space. But just because outdoor space hasn’t been the focus of most urban housing developers in the past doesn’t mean you should miss out on the current movement to create more livable outdoor space for downtown urban residents.

If you know you want to live in the city, consider seeking housing developments which make outdoor space a key focus in their design.

In fact, once they figure out that it’s possible, urban residents may find ample reason to prioritize outdoor living space- even more than suburban residents.

Why?

Perhaps some would balk at the idea of giving up coveted indoor square footage to something like a patio or outdoor kitchen. But most people don’t actually use all the indoor areas of their house- they frequent certain favorite spaces and essentially pay for other indoor spaces they hardly use. Typically, these spaces are dining rooms, sitting rooms, hallways, and entrances or foyers.

Prioritizing outdoor space in urban development is an up-and-coming housing trend because homeowners actually use outdoor space. As it turns out, people really like being outside! Not only will you actually hang out in your outdoor urban space- it will help you stay healthy and well-adjusted in a sometimes congested environment.

Parks and other urban green spaces have been proven to be beneficial physically and emotionally to urban residents. Downtown Asheville planners are prioritizing green space over “grey space” in city design, providing healthier, more livable and walkable urban environments.

Applying what we know about the benefits of including green space in urban planning to what we do as developers is the kind of innovation that will change our understanding of urban housing entirely.

Entertain the possibilities for outdoor living space in urban housing.

Urban living no longer means you have to stare out your sad window at the side of someone else’s building. If you’re in the market for a home, perhaps you thought you had to choose between the culture and excitement of urban living and the peace and enjoyment of an outdoor space on your property.

Now you can live, work and play in the city and relax outdoors without taking a retreat to the outskirts.

With innovative housing design, we can offer city dwellers more access to outdoor space than ever before. Visualize seamlessly blended indoor/outdoor spaces, joined by large sliding glass doors and windows. Instead of being relegated to their indoor rooms, residents can prep food or lounge with a cocktail on the deck on a balmy summer night or enjoy hot tea in a three-season “winter garden” room.

For example, our latest downtown housing development in Asheville, North Carolina gives residents access to all of the culture of downtown but prioritizes a focus on the mountains and making the building feel immersed in both the city and natural landscapes simultaneously. To do this, we designed the residences with plenty of efficient glass for mountain and treetop views, operable windows for fresh air and natural light, quaint seasonal garden rooms to maximize greenery and growth, and the largest private decks for cooking, playing and relaxing around a fireplace. Instead of forcing all the residents to share one small rooftop patio or garden, each resident has his or her own private outdoor living space.

Asheville has ample cultural and social draws for urban residents- whether you’re a craft beer enthusiast, music fan or foodie, this small city in the mountains is bursting at the seams with opportunities for engagement.

We couldn’t think of a better way to serve residents of the city in the mountains than to offer access to the beauty of the North Carolina outdoors and the experience of the city simultaneously.

Learn more about our sophisticated urban units with more outdoor living space than any other development, all in the heart of thriving downtown Asheville.